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Overseas Players

CCL Overseas Players Statement January 2018    click

Managed migration

In advance of the 2018 season, it is imperative that all accredited ECB Clubs and Leagues are aware of the updated information regarding Managed Migration in Club Cricket.

The ECB has been working with accredited ECB Premier Leagues since September 2016, assisting them with the monitoring and enforcement of the Immigration Rules set by the Home Office. Having reviewed levels of compliance as part of the ECB’s 2017 season review, it is vital that ECB Clubs and Leagues take note of the information and assistance available to them.

ECB Document  November 2017 Update

 

Downloads 2018

CCL OS1  Professional Overseas Player Information Form    Professional Overseas Player Information Form 2018OS1

CCL OS2  Amateur Overseas Player Information Form   CCLOverseasDeclarationFormOS2

CCL OS3  Overseas Club Checklist       CCL Overseas Check List Form OS3

ECB / Home Office Visa Overview   Final-Home-Office-Visa-Overview-231117

CCL Overseas Eligibility Chart             OverseasEligibility2018

CCL Overseas Definitions Chart              OverseasDefinitions

CCL Player Registration Rules 2018      Cornwall Cricket League Player Registration Rules 2018

 

Useful Links

The Home Office Website

ECB Governing Body Endorsement Webpage

Email ECB at managedmigration@ecb.co.uk

For advice that might save clubs spending money unneccessarily in trying to obtain visas etc email CCL Overseas Player Administrator Dave Eggins at deggins@btinternet.com  m 07740 049324

 

During the 2016/17 close season the ECB and Home Office  advised changes to the criteria regarding bringing in of Overseas Players to Cricket Leagues, with stricter regulations in place. This page brings together all the information from ECB, the CCL, forms and explanatory documents.

ECB Managed Migration Statement & Q & As    (Dec 2016)      Managed Migration Dec 2016

CCL Statement regarding Overseas Players (Feb 2017)      CCL Statement regarding overseas players

 

ECB Important Information for Leagues & Clubs in 2017   22 February
We know that understanding visa requirements for overseas players joining your club can be a tricky web to untangle. The difference between ‘professional sportspersons’ and ‘amateurs’ can seem blurred and knowing what you need to do legally, can therefore seem too difficult to bother with.

Unfortunately, we can’t provide you with legal advice directly. However, we’ll continue to do our best to explain your requirements in the simplest way possible. For more information, we recommend you visit the Home Office website or check out some useful links below as well as an FAQ sheet.

Should you have any further queries, please email us at managedmigration@ecb.co.uk.

 

 

CCL Statement 20th January 2017
Following more communication from ECB regarding the much stricter regulations on overseas players in leagues, we have to advise that, as we understand it , any overseas player who has at any time in their career played for money (any First Class, any List A, 20/20 cups where money is involved) in their home country are classified as a professional and  will not be allowed to play club cricket in the UK, except as a current professional and with a Tier 5 visa.

 

The extent of the term ‘professional’ has yet to finally defined, but in order to be rather more safe than sorry, the League must advise that where there is any doubt whatsoever the club holds fire on any expenditure and commitment on any potential agreement with a non-Tier 5 overseas player, no matter what the agent may say. The ECB are saying that they are expecting a final definition on the wording behind ‘professional’  from the Home Office within the next three weeks.

 If any club is found to have engaged such a player without performing themselves (not taking the agent’s word) rigid background checks (cricinfo, google, native country cricket stats) to ensure the player is a legitimate amateur, then the club chairman,  who is deemed in the eyes of HMRC to be ‘the employer’, will be personally liable for the hefty penalties that may be imposed for illegally employing a professional cricketer

The League will be expected to vet applications, although the final responsibility does lie with the individual clubs and chairs of clubs. If we suspect there is any doubt, the player will not get clearance, so clubs henceforth will have to notify the league of their intentions before going ahead and engaging an overseas player. An appeal through the Home Office may be lodged and if successful the LMC will review the application, but we emphasise that we must be seen to apply the regulations strictly. 

The Tier 5 professional by the way will count as both the one overseas and the one paid player allowed per club (rules 14.2 -14.5)

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